Kergrist, Morbihan

Le 2ème Grande Pique-Nique      

de KERGRIST

Organisé par l’association « Friends & neighbours / Amis et Voisins »

vintage picnic 2

  • Dimanche 7 juillet à partir de midi dans le champ de la Salle des Fêtes
  • Jeux pour les enfants – Château Gonflable – Surprises
  • Jeux pour les grands – compétition de tire à l’arc avec prix à la clé !
  • Musique Live – avec des groupes de folk locale (dont CHANTIMOR)
  • Glaces, gâteaux, samosas, bières locale en vente et plus encore !
  • Entrée Libre
  • Chacun vient avec son panier (Assiettes, verres, couverts et provisions solides et liquides)
  • Un barbecue sera à disposition des convives pour des grillades.

Venez nombreux !

vintage picnic

2nd Annual “Friends & Neighbours / Amis et Voisins” Picnic at KERGRIST

  • Sunday 7th July from midday in the field by the Salle des Fêtes
  • Bouncy Castle / Archery competition / Prizes & Surprises
  • Live music by local folk groups (including CHANTIMOR)
  • Ice-creams, cakes, samosas, local beer etc. on sale
  • Free entry – Just bring your own picnic.
  • A BBQ will be available for your bangers & burgers!

The more – the merrier – so see you there!

piquenique

Hello from The Aude

I sent a message in a bottle to the Aude Shanty Men via Facebook, and here is their reply:

« Greetings to all our friends and kindred spirits who make up Chantimor! Thank you for your message and good wishes – which we heartily reciprocate. I have passed on the links to all members of our Crew and I am certain they will enjoy your website as much as I did. Now we are in touch, let’s stay that way. Keep up the fine work you are doing. It is great to know you are blazing a trail for English shanties in beautiful Brittany. »

AudeShantyMen

For anyone who hasn’t already checked them out, click on the link to their site on the right.

Nice to know we are not alone! A wee tot of rum all round, I think. Don’t you?

 

Ships, Boats and Maritime Stuff 1

When Henry VIII came to the throne in 15O9, the small navy he inherited from his father Henry VII had only two reasonably large ships: the carracks Regent and Sovereign.

In 1510 he started to oversee the construction of two new ships – and they were launched in 1511.

One of them famously sank in the Solent in 1545, and can be seen today in Portsmouth in its own newly opened museum. It is, of course the Mary Rose. (More about that in a seperate post.)

But did you know that there was a sister ship, which went by the fabulous name of the Peter Pomegranate?

It is likely that the ship was named in honour of Saint Peter and Katharine of Aragon (the first wife of Henry VIII) whose heraldic symbol was  – yep,  you’ve guessed it – a pomegranate.

Katharine of Aragon

The Peter Pomegranate was slightly smaller than the Mary Rose, weighing in at 450 tons. However, in 1536 it was refurbished and enlarged to bring its tonnage up to 600. By now, Henry was married to Anne Boleyn so the Pomegranate part of the name was dropped and the ship became known simply as the Peter.

According to an inventory of 1547, the rebuilt Peter had  …. “185 sailors, 185 soldiers, and 30 gunners. Her armaments included: 2 brass demi-cannons, 2 brass culverins, 4 brass demi-culverins, 4 brass sakers, an iron culverin, 3 iron sakers, 9 iron port pieces, 37 iron bases, and 11 hagbuts. There were also 259 yew bows, 160 bills; and 160 Moorish pikes.”

It seems to me that culverins, sakers and hagbuts deserve a post all of their own, so if anyone has specialist knowledge of these Tudor items and would like to write a blog-post – I’ll happily publish it.

The ship’s fate is not recorded, but it was last mentioned in records in 1558.

And here she is: the beautiful Peter Pomegranate in all her splendor!

PP large