City of Adelaide goes home.

Here’s a Blog article from Shanty Man Geoff….     

(Grey italics & pix are interference from the Ed.)

CLIPPER SHIP CITY OF ADELAIDE / HMS CARRICK

In 1864, 5 years before the construction of the Cutty Sark, the clipper ship City of Adelaide was built. These are the only two composite clipper ships remaining in the world.  Between 1864 and 1886 the City of Adelaide carried passengers from London to South Australia.

This is how she would have looked in her heyday:-

City of Adelaide clipperIn 1923 she became « HMS Carrick »,  and was an RNVR training ship on the Clyde until 1949 when she was used as an RNVR clubhouse. In 1992 the Scottish National Maritime Museum took responsibility for the vessel and she was moved to a slipway at Irvine. Funding for restoration was not forthcoming, and, after negotiation, ownership of the ship has now been transferred to a project team from Adelaide, South Australia.

City of Adelaide clipper 2

In a delicate manoeuvre the ship was embarked on a barge and left Irvine under tow on 20 September for passage to Chatham dockyard where it arrived on 25 September.

This is how the poor ol’ girl looks today:-

clipper Adelaide

On the afternoon of 18 October there will be a ceremony at the Old Royal Naval College Greenwich attended by the Duke of Edinburgh where the ship’s name will be formally changed back to the « City of Adelaide ». Greenwich has been chosen because it is home to the « Cutty Sark », and it is planned that the « City of Adelaide » (on barge) will be in the river opposite the college.

Greenwich Naval College

The ship will subsequently be transferred to a heavy lift ship for transporting to Adelaide, where she will be restored to her former glory.

If you would like to attend the ceremony and subsequent social event at Greenwich on 18 October, you are invited to register online at www.cityofadelaide.org.au, go to Renaming Ceremony and then register. The event runs from 2.30 to 5.30pm and costs £25. All interested persons are welcome.

The above website gives a detailed account of the history of the ship and the delicate operation to get her back home. Also, once on the site, if you click on MEDIA, then go to MUSIC, you will see various (and fascinating) versions of « South Australia » performed by groups from around the world.

For some reason, they haven’t included Chantimor – can’t think why – so here’s a little clip of our own efforts:- 

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